Exhibitions and Events

Windows with Muntin/Georgian Bars – better than thought

Glazing bars (Muntin or Georgian Bars, “Sprossen”) are an indispensible instrument to design the appearance of buildings. But not only aluminum spacers in the edge bond of insulating glass elements are thermally-wise disadvantageous. Bars between the panes of a multiple glazing create thermal discontinuities, that have to be taken into consideration when determining the Uw-value of windows.

In my new webinar “Sprossen” for the BF (German Federal Flat Glass Association) on Wednesday, April 13th, 2016, I will explain why such glazing bars occur on windows at all, which types of bars are possible with multiple plane insulating glass and how Muntin/Georgian windows can be determined thermally-wise in a fairer manner compared to the high surcharges from the product standard for windows, EN 14351-1. (The webinar will be in German language).

Online-signup to the BF-Webinars is possible here.

 

Glasstec 2014 – News about “warm edge”?

In a contribution to the column “Pro & Contra” of the October issue of the German magazine GFF-Magazins [here], I anticipated no quantum leaps regarding warm edge technology, shown on Glasstec 2014 in Duesseldorf. During my visit of this spectacular event, I could verify my point of view – no revolutionary new material or machine technology were exhibited, but I found an increase in options for existing solutions, and that both regarding material and machines for processing. You can find details in my latest article in GFF-Magazin, issue 12/2014 [here], (I apologize that it is all in German language.)

Impressions from BAU 2013 Munich

How nice to almost exclusively see triple glazings with warm edge spacers in the exhibits of the wooden and pvc window producers of Hall B4, C4 and B5. It has got around that warm edge is advantageous because it improves the Uw-values. The further distribution of warm edge is unstoppable, same as for triple glazing.

Metallic systems though seem not yet to have taken the message entirely. Hall A1 still contained quite a few exhibits with double glazings, often with aluminium spacers. What a pity, considering the high thermotechnical sensitivity of metallic window and facade systems to the improvement of the transition area between glass and frame. The use of warm edge makes technical sense and is a economic measure. As for the next BAU 2015, I am confident that regarding spacer and glass, also the exhibits in hall A1 will be up-to-date.